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Empower Eneterprise
Solutions

Empower Solutions has a proven track record of delivering business value to its customers by helping them solve problems and execute on strategies in the next key areas: enterprise architecture (EA), business architectures (BA), information architecture (IA), service-oriented architecture (SOA), information system architecture (ISA) and data architecture (DA).

With an empower proven methodology for IT architecture, developing and deploying high-quality and high-performance solutions, Empower Solutions can help organizations address problems of all shapes and sizes.

Organizations face an increasing volume, variety and velocity of information.

Empower Solutions leverages high performance integration expertise to help organizations implement enterprise architecture technologies.

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Empower Enterprise Architecture

View of the structure of an enterprise

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Business Architecture

The business views of an enterprises

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Information Architecture

Information architecture is the science of figuring out what you want your site to do.

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Service-Oriented Architecture

Empower Solutions implements OMG SOA Metamodel

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Information System Architecture

Encompasses the hardware and software used to deliver the solution to the final consumer of services.

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Data Architecture

Data structures used by a business and/or its applications.

Empower Enterprise Architecture
(EEA)

Enterprise architectures use various business methods and tools to understand and document the structure of an enterprise. In doing so, they produce documents and models, together called artifacts. These artifacts describe the logical organization of business strategies, metrics, business capabilities, business processes, information resources, business systems, and networking infrastructure within the enterprise.

A complete collection of these artifacts, sufficient to describe the enterprise in useful ways, could be considered an "enterprise" level architectural description, or an enterprise architecture, for short. This is the definition of enterprise architecture implied by the popular TOGAF architectural framework.

An enterprise architecture framework is a collection of tools, process models, and guidance used by architects to assist in the production of organization-specific architectural descriptions. See the related article on enterprise architecture frameworks for further information..

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Business Architecture
In order to develop an integrated view of an enterprise, Empower Solutions develops many different views of an organization. The key views of the enterprise within the business architecture are:
Business Strategy view : captures the tactical and strategic goals that drive an organization forward. The goals are decomposed into various tactical approaches for achieving these goals and for providing traceability through the organization. These tactical and strategic goals are mapped to metrics that provide ongoing evaluation of how successfully the organization is achieving its goals.
Business Capabilities view : describes the primary business activities of an enterprise and the pieces of the organization that perform those functions. This view further distinguishes between customer-facing functions, supplier-related functions, business execution, and business management functions.
Business Process view : defines the set of strategic, core and support processes that transcend functional and organizational boundaries. It sets the context of the enterprise by identifying and describing external entities such as customers, suppliers, and external systems that interact with the business. The processes also describe which people, resources and controls are involved in the process. The lowest process level describes the manual and automated tasks that make up workflow.
Business Knowledge view : establishes the shared semantics (e.g., customer, order, and supplier) within an organization and relationships between those semantics (e.g., customer name, order date, supplier name). These semantics form the vocabulary that the organization relies upon to communicate and structure the understanding of the areas they operate within.
Organizational view : captures the relationships among roles, capabilities and business units, the decomposition of those business units into subunits, and the internal or external management of those units.
In addition to the above views of the enterprise, the relationships connecting the aforementioned views form the foundation of the business architecture. This foundation provides the framework that supports the achievement of key goals; planning and execution of various business scenarios; and delivery of bottom line business value.


Information Architecture
Information architecture is the science of figuring out what you want your site to do and then constructing a blueprint before you dive in and put the thing together. It is more important than you might think.
The first looks at how to define your sites goals, shedding light on the all-important art of collecting clients or co-workers opinions and assembling them in a coherent, weighted order of importance. He also shares his scheme for documenting everything so that all parties can keep up.
The next step is figuring out who the heck your audiences are going to be. Once that is out of the way, you can start organizing your future site into pages of content and functions that the site will need to have.
Next, Squishy gets into creativityland, where you start to build the beast:form a skeleton, pick your metaphors, map out your navigation. Then it is time to break out the graphics program, come up with layout grids, design sketches, and mock-ups, and get ready to build!

Service-Oriented Architecture

Our best practices include usage of SOA Framework
[Created by Angela Martin based on Michael Bells book Service-Oriented Modeling: Analysis, Design, and Architecture, Wiley, 2008]

Service-oriented modeling is a SOA framework that identifies the various disciplines that guide SOA practitioners to conceptualize, analyze, design, and architect their service-oriented assets.

The Service-Oriented Modeling Framework (SOMF) is a work structure or "map" depicting the various components that contribute to a successful service-oriented modeling approach. It illustrates the major elements that identify the "what to do" aspects of a service development scheme.
The model enables practitioners to craft a project plan and to identify the milestones of a service-oriented initiative. SOMF also provides a common modeling notation to address alignment between business and IT organizations.
SOMF is designed to address the following principles:
* Business Traceability
* Architectural Best-Practices Traceability
* Technological Traceability
* SOA Value Proposition
* Software Assets Reuse
* SOA Integration Strategies
* Technological Abstraction and Generalization

Service-Oriented Architecture

SOA can support integration and consolidation activities within complex enterprise systems, but SOA does not specify or provide a methodology or framework for documenting capabilities or services.
At first look, instituting an enterprise SOA can appear to be a daunting task. Many of the same questions come from those who are just trying to gain a basic understanding of the SOA fundamentals. Issues around organizational governance, such as establishing an SOA Steering Committee and Program Management Office, need to be addressed. Managing the entire service lifecycle, including policies that define service level agreements and security are other requirements. It is important to address these issues early in the planning process to ensure a successful SOA deployment.

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Empower Solutions implements OMG SOA Metamodel

OMG is an open membership, international organization of information system vendors, software vendors, and end-user companies. Through its members, the OMG produces and maintains specifications for interoperable software. The OMG SOA Special Interest Group focuses on definition of methodology and models for SOA. Its UPMS RFP aims to address a part of the overall SOA metamodel by linking architectural, business and technology views of services.

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An information system architecture is a formal definition of the business processes and rules, systems structure, technical framework, and product technologies for a business or organizational information system. An information system architecture usually consists of four layers: business process architecture, systems architecture, technical architecture, and product delivery architecture.
The architecture of an information system encompasses the hardware and software used to deliver the solution to the final consumer of services. The architecture is a description of the design and contents of a computerized system. If documented, the architecture may include information such as a detailed inventory of current hardware, software and networking capabilities; a description of long-range plans and priorities for future purchases, and a plan for upgrading and/or replacing dated equipment and software. The architecture should document: What data is stored?, How does the system function?, Where are components located?, When do activities and events occur in the system?, and Why does the system exist?


Data Architecture in enterprise architecture is the design of data for use in defining the target state and the subsequent planning needed to hit the target state. It is usually one of several architecture domains that form the pillars of an enterprise architecture or solution architecture.
A data architecture describes the data structures used by a business and/or its applications. There are descriptions of data in storage and data in motion; descriptions of data stores, data groups and data items; and mappings of those data artifacts to data qualities, applications, locations etc.
Essential to realizing the target state, Data Architecture describes how data is processed, stored, and utilized in a given system. It provides criteria for data processing operations that make it possible to design data flows and also control the flow of data in the system.
The Data Architect is responsible for defining the target state, alignment during development and then minor follow up to ensure enhancements are done in the spirit of the original blueprint.
During the definition of the target state, the Data Architecture breaks a subject down to the atomic level and then builds it back up to the desired form. The Data Architect breaks the subject down by going through 3 traditional architectural processes:
* Conceptual - represents all business entities.
* Logical - represents the logic of how entities are related.
* Physical - the realization of the data mechanisms for a specific type of functionality.

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